Climate change migration causing more problems

Published: Comments:
Climate Change Environment Science & Research University & TAFE

Social:   
Image from Dr Jacobson’s trip to South East Asia

Farmers migrating from their communities in South East Asia to escape financial problems caused by climate change may be leaving their families in a poverty trap, a sustainability researcher has found.

Dr Christine Jacobson from the University of the Sunshine Coast worked with the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization to survey rural Cambodian families about their experience after a family member migrates.

The study, recently published in Regional Environmental Change, found that migration may not be the best option to deal with climate change, as it led to more problems for the families left behind.

“Migration appears survivalist at best and, given climate projections, may prove itself to be maladaptive response to climate change,” Dr Jacobson said.

“They may be migrating to send home money to their families, but the loss of labour means they aren’t cultivating all of their land.”

“They are leaving behind women and children who are unable to manage all of the agricultural tasks, and they are, in turn, at risk of food insecurity.”

Dr Jacobson said climate-related migration rates in Cambodia cold affect up to 57% of households, and lead to labour shortages, youth safety and education issues, and female safety issues.

“We identified a clear pattern of climate-reinforced poverty trap, whereby climate-related changes cause food insecurity, leading to migration that does not necessarily alleviate food insecurity, but leads to a range of social consequences,” she said.

“Participants identified an increased risk of violence against women and more issues to do with the welfare of children, such as not going to school.”

She said the problem may be being reinforced by income-generating initiatives for rural areas that do not properly consider the traditional roles of women in agriculture, such as smarter production techniques that rely on the male’s farming skills.

“We really need to think about the gendered implications. If a man leaves, a woman’s workload increases and she may need to take on tasks for which she has no training.”

Dr Jacobson said the findings highlighted the need to develop alternative strategies to migration that built community resilience so that those left behind were still able to meet their basic needs, such as having enough food to eat, and a chance for education.


Image from Dr Jacobson’s trip to South East Asia

 
University Of The Sunshine Coast : View Full Profile
90 Sippy Downs Drive, Sippy Downs
07 5430 1234
University Of The Sunshine Coast
Showing 10+ recent articles for this business
USC Moreton Bay starts to take shape 21 September 2018 | The impressive foundation building of the University of the Sunshine Coast’s new campus at Petrie is starting to take shape. More information...
Trolls don’t get job roles, employers say 20 September 2018 | Internet trolls beware – employers believe the most unprofessional behaviour online is the use of social media to intentionally harm others. More information...
Rock lobster could unlock genetics of kids’ kidneys 18 September 2018 | Cutting-edge genetic research into changing the sex of rock lobsters could hold the key to a PhD graduate from the University of the Sunshine Coast helping find a cure for a deadly children’s kidney disease. More information...
‘Mrs Robinson effect’ skews public perception of abuse 18 September 2018 | Dr Lara Christensen from the University of the Sunshine Coast – speaking ahead of Foxtel’s screening of Mary Kay Letourneau: Autobiography on Saturday – says the lasting psychological effects of child sexual... More information...
Fulbright scholar to lead state road safety team from Sunshine Coast 17 September 2018 | A Fulbright Senior Scholar is moving to USC to lead a new state-wide road safety research team from the Sunshine Coast. More information...
Plastic proves lethal to sea turtles 14 September 2018 | The risk that plastic pollution poses to the world’s declining sea turtle populations has been quantified for the first time. More information...
Clothing executive claims USC alumni award 14 September 2018 | A University of the Sunshine Coast graduate who has led the global expansion of European clothing giant Mango for the past seven years has claimed the title of USC’s Outstanding Alumnus for 2018. More information...
USC sport scientist to lead swim team to Tokyo 13 September 2018 | A USC academic who led the Australian team into the stadium as an athlete at the Sydney 2000 Paralympic Games has put his hand up again to lead the way towards success at the Tokyo Games in 2020. More information...
Climate change migration causing more problems 12 September 2018 | Farmers migrating from their communities in South East Asia to escape financial problems caused by climate change may be leaving their families in a poverty trap, a sustainability researcher has found. More information...
Graduate makes mark in world of global business 11 September 2018 | A University of the Sunshine Coast graduate who heads human resources for an international firm’s operations in India, the Middle East and Africa has been named one of Norway’s best young leaders. More information...



Social:   
comments powered by Disqus

All articles submitted by third parties or written by My Sunshine Coast come under our Disclaimer / Terms of Service