Evictions

Published:

Unless the government urgently steps up – we're facing a health crisis that could kill hundreds of thousands.1

Around the world governments are rising to that challenge with measures that used to be unthinkable.

New York City and the United Kingdom have moved to suspend rental evictions and mortgage foreclosures.2,3 And that's exactly what the experts are saying is needed here if we're going to stop people being forced from their homes.4

We need an immediate guarantee that nobody will be evicted or have their mortgage foreclosed by the big banks due to COVID-19 – with no exceptions. Banks must not be allowed to profit off a disaster.

If we don't act fast, people who lose their jobs could be forced into overcrowded shelters or onto loved ones' couches – at a time when we should be keeping our physical distance. It could be the deciding factor in how fast COVID-19 spreads through our communities.

Will you sign onto the urgent call to suspend ALL evictions and foreclosures?

We've heard rumours that some of the major banks are already thinking about caving to demands for mortgage relief. It's a desperately needed step – so we need to make sure our pressure is unrelenting.

If we act quickly enough, there is a rare opportunity to have a double impact with this petition.
  1. We put enormous pressure on the major banks – and with most of them licking their wounds from the Royal Commission there is a very real chance they'll be forced to act.
  2. We will put all levels of government on notice that we need strong protections for renters, as well as mortgage-holders in this time of crisis.
This virus has shown us just how dependent we are on each other – we are only as safe as the most vulnerable in our communities. Will you urgently sign on to keep a roof over every head during this crisis – and help stop COVID from exploding?

SIGN HERE ✍️: No one should lose their accomodation during a public health crisis – especially when it endangers us all.

Getting sick reminds us that no matter where we live, what we look like or what's in our wallets – at our core we're all just humans.

But while thousands of people are being forced out of work, we need to rapidly build a more humane economy – one that supports everyday people to stay healthy and safe.

Our starting point must be this: making sure nobody loses their home because our governments and banks were too slow, or too cowardly, to protect us.

In determination,

Ed, Tessa, Rafi, Oliver and Charlie – for the GetUp Team

PS. We also need emergency shelter, and urgent investments in social housing for people currently sleeping rough. We'll have more to say on this in the days ahead as we set out our priorities for the government's response.

PPS. I've been thinking a lot about this insight from Naomi Klein: "Moments of shock are profoundly volatile. We either lose a whole lot of ground, get fleeced by elites and pay the price for decades - or we win progressive victories that seemed impossible just a few weeks earlier."

No sugarcoating – this moment is really scary. I know many of you might have family members you're worried about, for health, financial and emotional reasons. But it's also a moment for action. The reason so many of us have been fighting all these years is because we knew the system was broken, and we saw the cracks widening. This is a chance to rewrite the rules, for good.

References:
[1] Extrapolated from the modelling of Imperial College COVID-19 Response Team working paper, "Impact of non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) to reduce COVID- 19 mortality and healthcare demand" 16 March 2020
[2] The Guardian, "Jenrick announces coronavirus law to ban eviction of tenants", 18 March 2020
[3] Curbed, "New York halts evictions indefinitely due to coronavirus pandemic", 16 March 2020
[4] Domain, "Halt evictions: Calls to protect renters during coronavirus crisis", 18 March 2020
 
Australian Government Community Coronavirus COVID-19 Health & Wellness Law & Safety Political Property & Real Estate Surveys & Your Say
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GetUp! Australia :
PO Box A105, Sydney South, NSW, 1235, Australia Wide
GetUp! Australia
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