Official giving day helped change Libby’s life

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USC graduate Libby Dennis

USC Exercise Science graduate Libby Dennis knows first-hand the difference donations from strangers can make to students struggling to hold on to their study goals.

“It gave me peace of mind so I could focus on my study rather than worrying about where next week’s rent was coming from,” said Libby of the Student Study Bursary she received thanks to USC’s annual giving day G-Day.

“I moved from Toowoomba to study at the Sunshine Coast just a short time after my father suffered a heart attack, so my family was dealing with his recovery as well as supporting me to live away from home,” she said.

“I cannot describe how the bursary helped my USC journey,” she said. “I want to thank those people who didn’t know me yet still supported me, and I hope that I am doing them justice.”

This year’s G-Day will be held on 16 August to help support USC students from disadvantaged backgrounds who are at risk of withdrawing from study due to financial pressure.  

Every $2,000 raised will provide one student with a Study Support Bursary, which will directly assist with study-related costs such as textbooks, food and transportation.

The Scott Williams Foundation had pledged to match G-Day donations dollar for dollar up to $50,000.

Since graduating from USC, Libby has been working as an exercise physiologist, helping a diverse range of clients including those with intellectual disabilities, post-traumatic stress disorder and metabolic disorders.

“I want to work hard to give back in life. My goal is to own a holistic and collaborative sports and rehabilitation facility that caters for the training and treatment of the chronically ill as well as sports clients,” she said.

More than a thousand USC students applied for financial assistance this year.

USC Pro Vice-Chancellor (Engagement) Professor Joanne Scott said financial support could be the difference between students completing degrees or not.

“G-Day is also telling out students that we believe in them. There are people here at USC and in our community who want to support our students to succeed,” she said.

The University will stage a G-Day online crowdfunding campaign and provide activities at its campuses to encourage those who can to dig deep for students who are doing it tough.

The G-Day breakfast will be held at USC’s Sunshine Coast campus in Sippy Downs from 8am-11am. USC’s campuses at SouthBank and Fraser Coast will have special morning teas, while USC Gympie will have a G-Day lunch from noon-2pm.

One hundred percent of every gift will go directly to students and all donations of $2 or more are fully tax deductible.  For more information or to donate go to www.usc.edu.au/gday.

 
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