Seaweed science behind ‘Moreton Bae’ brew

Published:

Scientists from USC are hoping a beer brewed with “sea lettuce” from Moreton Bay will drive new interest in seaweed as a nutritious, tasty and locally-grown resource.

University of the Sunshine Coast Associate Professor of Aquaculture Dr Nick Paul has partnered with Newstead Brewing Co. in Brisbane to create what they believe is the first beer to feature Australian-farmed seaweed.

They called it Moreton Bae Resalinated Gose.

“Seaweed is a rapidly-growing resource, so we grew enough for this project in just one week,” Dr Paul said.

“The seaweed is fresh from USC’s research facility at Bribie Island, where pristine seawater supports the growth of premium-quality seaweed for food and beverage applications.” 

He said Australian consumers had been slow to realise the many benefits of seaweed but now that interest was growing rapidly, it made sense to consider applications for Australia’s food, beverage, health and biopharmaceutical industries.

“Seaweed will actually filter out the very best minerals from the ocean so it has nutritious elements like potassium, magnesium and in this case zinc and iron,” he said.

“This particular sea lettuce, called ulva, has more iron than spinach. Other seaweeds have more potassium than bananas.”

Newstead brewers steeped 25 kilograms of the sea lettuce in cold water to extract the salt characteristics and flavours to add to the ‘gose’ style beer, which has origins dating back centuries to Goslar, Germany.

Brewer Dr Evan Goulden said gose was historically a lightly sour, wheat-driven beer, incorporating spices such as coriander, but defined by a salt character, the result of mineral-rich town water supplies.

“For this beer, we used desalinated water from Seqwater – which is completely salt-free - and instead we used seaweed to “resalinate” and reimagine the gose style with a natural briny character. We also left out the coriander because we wanted some of those marine volatiles and the spiciness from the seaweed to shine.”

Dr Goulden, a former marine microbiologist, says the partnership offered an opportunity to drive public conversation.

“To create that awareness, not only about seaweed but about responsible and sustainable farming of seaweed is a fantastic initiative,” he said.

Dr Paul said that with growing global concerns around food security, seaweed was a fast-growing, tasty and plentiful resource for feeding a growing population.

“At the moment in Australia, it’s not really embedded in our culture but we’re hoping to change that,” he said.

“We actually have thousands of species of seaweed off the coast of Australia and none of them are being used commercially, so there is this huge bounty of opportunity.

“Different seaweeds have different properties and it’s all about finding the right seaweed for the right application and working with the right partners to do that.”

Newstead Brewing Co. also opens its doors to USC science students so they can learn about the complex biotechnology behind the brewing process first-hand.

The beer is currently in stock throughout Queensland. Today it will be judged in the Royal Queensland Food and Wine Show, in the running for the title of Champion Beer Utilising Desalinated Water.

 
Community Food & Wine Lifestyle Science & Research University & TAFE
Social:   

University Of The Sunshine Coast : View Full Profile
90 Sippy Downs Drive, Sippy Downs
07 5430 1234
University Of The Sunshine Coast
Showing 10+ recent articles for this business
USC scientist joins world-first lobster research hub 17 September 2019 | A USC molecular researcher who pioneered a technique to change the sex of crustaceans will play a vital role in a $26 million, five-year joint project to establish the world’s first land-based rock lobster... More information...
Honorary award for inclusive social sport volunteer 19 September 2019 | A Buderim volunteer helping drive the expansion of inclusive sport on the Sunshine Coast to encourage more social interaction between able-bodied people and those with disabilities will become a USC Honorary... More information...
Honours researcher in running to ease rare disease 12 September 2019 | A USC Dietetics Honours student determined to live a fit and healthy life despite a rare and debilitating genetic disorder has launched her national survey into the condition on the same weekend she completed a... More information...
USC to host Lightning’s Community Thank You event 15 September 2019 | USC is hosting the event to give fans the chance to meet players and coaching staff, collect signatures, and to say farewell to the club’s foundation coach Noeline Taurua. More information...
A meeting of cultures for print symposium 11 September 2019 | USC’s Art Gallery will soon host a two-day public forum featuring a Japanese print art expert to coincide with the opening of a stunning exhibition of Japanese and Australian print art at Caloundra Regional... More information...
USC Journalism graduate wins statewide award 10 September 2019 | Drew Beveridge is no doubt flying high after she was named Queensland’s most outstanding final-year journalism student. More information...
USC backs Lightning with ‘wear yellow to work’ day 10 September 2019 | USC staff will be sporting the colour yellow tomorrow (Wednesday 11 September) as a bright show of support for Sunshine Coast Lightning ahead of the Suncorp Super Netball grand final on Sunday 15 September. More information...
Today is World Suicide Prevention Day 10 September 2019 | We have received overwhelming response from the community in support of our World Suicide Prevention Day mission: to train 100 people as suicide-alert community gatekeepers. We see gatekeepers as people whose... More information...
Study finds value for money trumps online ratings 09 September 2019 | Online reviews have revolutionised the way travellers select hotels, but a USC researcher has found when it comes to swaying consumers, ratings cannot beat old fashioned price and location.  More information...
Peony scientist breaks new ground for cut flowers 09 September 2019 | One of the world’s most popular flowers – the peony – can now be grown in hot climates, following a discovery that could disrupt the multi-billion dollar global cut flower industry. More information...


comments powered by Disqus

All articles submitted by third parties or written by My Sunshine Coast come under our Disclaimer / Terms of Service